Narrator: Once upon a time in a faraway land, there was a tiny kingdom; peaceful, prosperous, and rich in romance and tradition. Here in a stately chateau, there lived a widowed gentleman, and his little daughter, Cinderella. Although he was a kind and devoted father, and gave his beloved child every luxury and comfort, still, he felt she needed a mother's care. And so he married again, choosing for his second wife, a woman of good family, with two daughters just Cinderella's age, by name, ...
The Grand Duke and the Captain of the guards lead the search for the mystery princess by trying the slipper on every woman in the kingdom, but it refuses to fit anyone. At the Tremaine estate, the shoe fits neither stepsister; the company prepares to depart, but hear Ella singing Lavender's Blue. The Grand Duke urges them to leave, but Kit, who has secretly accompanied them, commands the Captain to investigate. The slipper fits Ella, and she and Kit promise to accept one another for who they truly are. As they leave, Ella forgives her stepmother. Soon after, Lady Tremaine, her daughters, and the Grand Duke leave the kingdom, never to return.
The translation of the story into cultures with different standards of beauty has left the significance of Cinderella's shoe size unclear, and resulted in the implausibility of Cinderella's feet being of a unique size for no particular reason. Humorous retellings of the story sometimes use the twist of having the shoes turn out to also fit somebody completely unsuitable, such as an amorous old crone. In Terry Pratchett's Witches Abroad, the witches accuse another witch of manipulating the events because it was a common shoe size, and she could only ensure that the right woman put it on if she already knew where she was and went straight to her. In "When the Clock Strikes" (from Red As Blood), Tanith Lee had the sorcerous shoe alter shape whenever a woman tried to put it on, so it would not fit.
Starvation or extreme diets may result in rapid weight loss, but such quick weight loss can be unsafe and is almost impossible to maintain for most people. When food intake is severely restricted (below approximately 1,200 calories per day), the body begins to adapt to this state of poor nutrition by reducing its metabolic rate, potentially making it even more difficult to lose weight. This also happens when dieters engage in fasting or skipping meals. It is also possible to experience hunger pangs, bouts of hypoglycemia, headaches, and mood changes from overly stringent dieting. These health symptoms can result in binge eating and weight gain. Since a highly restrictive diet is almost impossible to maintain for a long time, people who attempt to starve themselves thin often start to gain weight again when they stop dieting and resume their former eating habits.

The Flat Belly Fix program is really easy to follow. It gets straight to the point, eliminates all of the nonsense no one actually wants to learn about and gets you working towards better eating and more effective exercise. The only downside is that the meal timings and composition was a little different to follow, and I would have loved to see all of the quality information laid out in an easy-to-read table. The good news is that you do have it; it’s just not laid out as pretty as I had hoped.
Lifestyle and work habits partially determine how many calories we need to eat each day. Someone whose job involves heavy physical labor will naturally burn more calories in a day than someone who sits at a desk most of the day (a sedentary job). For people who do not have jobs that require intense physical activity, exercise or increased physical activity can increase the number of calories burned.
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