With a rapid speed of coming forth of the launched Apps into the internet connection nowadays, going along with that modern industry, The Venus factor eliminates the personal trainers’ cost applying, an introduction of new expansion of a handy app to easily access to automate various processes. The extra effects on The virtual nutritionist software app, you just fill in some figures of your body like height, weight, waist, age and so on, the listed calories on its own figure for indicating your reality health state in that present time. According to that figures, you can look at yourself some various things in your body, then, it is very easier for you to change your transferring to the ultimate goal (losing weight).

Cinderella had its world premiere on February 13, 2015, at the 65th Berlin International Film Festival and was released theatrically in the United States on March 13, 2015, and in the United Kingdom on March 27 in standard and IMAX formats by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. It grossed over $542 million worldwide, becoming Branagh's highest-grossing film to date as a director. The film received generally positive reviews from critics, with many praising the performances (particularly James, Blanchett, and Bonham Carter), Branagh's direction, musical score, costume design, production values, and faithfulness to the original animated film. It received a nomination at the 88th Academy Awards, 21st Critics' Choice Awards and 69th British Academy Film Awards, all for costume design.

Several different variants of the story appear in the medieval One Thousand and One Nights, also known as the Arabian Nights, including "The Second Shaykh's Story", "The Eldest Lady's Tale" and "Abdallah ibn Fadil and His Brothers", all dealing with the theme of a younger sibling harassed by two jealous elders. In some of these, the siblings are female, while in others, they are male. One of the tales, "Judar and His Brethren", departs from the happy endings of previous variants and reworks the plot to give it a tragic ending instead, with the younger brother being poisoned by his elder brothers.[17]
This individual's goal is to lose the 16 pounds she has gained. Since her weight has been gradually increasing, she knows that she is consuming more calories than she is burning, especially with her sedentary job. She decides that losing weight at a rate of 1 pound per week (equal to a deficit of about 3,500 calories, or cutting 500 calories per day) would be acceptable and would allow her to reach her goal in about four months.
Cinderella is living a dissatisfying life, having lost both parents at a young age, and being forced to work as a scullery maid in her own château. Her stepmother, Lady Tremaine, is cruel to her, and she is jealous of Cinderella's charm and beauty. Additionally her two stepsisters, Drizella and Anastasia, cruelly take advantage of her. In spite of this, Cinderella is a kind and gentle young woman. She is friends with mice and kind to birds that live in and around the château. Meanwhile, at the royal palace, the King is frustrated that his son, the Prince, still is not married. He and the Grand Duke organize a ball in an effort to find a suitable wife for the bored and picky Prince, requesting every eligible maiden attend. Upon receiving notice of the ball, Lady Tremaine agrees to let Cinderella go if she finishes her chores and can find a suitable dress to wear.
In 1951, the film received three Academy Award nominations for Best Sound (C. O. Slyfield) lost to All About Eve, Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture (Oliver Wallace and Paul J. Smith) lost to Annie Get Your Gun and Best Music, Original Song for "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo" (Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman) lost to Captain Carey, U.S.A..[6][76] At the 1st Berlin International Film Festival it won the Golden Bear (Music Film) award and the Big Bronze Plate award.[77]
In a coda added in the second edition of 1819, during Aschenputtel's wedding, as she walks down the aisle with her stepsisters as her bridesmaids, (they had hoped to worm their way into her favour), the doves fly down and strike the two stepsisters' eyes, one in the left and the other in the right. When the wedding comes to an end, and Aschenputtel and her prince march out of the church, the doves fly again, striking the remaining eyes of the two evil sisters blind, a punishment they had to endure for the rest of their lives.[23]
The Chinese story of Ye Xian, first attested in a source from around AD 860, is another early variant of the story. The first literary European version of the story was published in Italy by Giambattista Basile in his Pentamerone in 1634; the version that is now most widely known in the English-speaking world was published in French by Charles Perrault in Histoires ou contes du temps passé in 1697.[6] Another version was later published by the Brothers Grimm in their folk tale collection Grimms' Fairy Tales in 1812.
It is a comprehensive, easy-to-follow guideline about how to lose weight naturally. It is a downloadable book that comes with specific methods and techniques you can use on a daily basis. It reveals simple and efficient tips, methods and techniques you won't find elsewhere. It promises to help you achieve your weight loss goals through specific exercises and list of foods to eat.
The glass slipper is unique to Charles Perrault's version and its derivatives; in other versions of the tale it may be made of other materials (in the version recorded by the Brothers Grimm, German: Aschenbroedel and Aschenputtel, for instance, it is gold) and in still other tellings, it is not a slipper but an anklet, a ring, or a bracelet that gives the prince the key to Cinderella's identity. In Rossini's opera "La Cenerentola" ("Cinderella"), the slipper is replaced by twin bracelets to prove her identity. In the Finnish variant The Wonderful Birch the prince uses tar to gain something every ball, and so has a ring, a circlet, and a pair of slippers. Some interpreters, perhaps troubled by sartorial impracticalities, have suggested that Perrault's "glass slipper" (pantoufle de verre) had been a "squirrel fur slipper" (pantoufle de vair) in some unidentified earlier version of the tale, and that Perrault or one of his sources confused the words; however, most scholars believe the glass slipper was a deliberate piece of poetic invention on Perrault's part.[28] The 1950 Disney adaptation takes advantage of the slipper being made of glass to add a twist whereby the slipper is shattered just before Cinderella has the chance to try it on, leaving her with only the matching slipper with which to prove her identity.

This unique system was created by Todd Lamb, who has a long list of certifications. He’s a veteran police officer of 17 years, a retired SWAT team leader, a SWAT and Canine dog handler, has military experience and the list goes on. Now, you may be wondering what this has to do with fitness. Well, everything Todd has done in the past has a lot to do with keeping in shape and being strong. Police officers, SWAT members, dog handlers, and military members all have an intense fitness regime they must follow. So, what he has learned from his previous careers ultimately shaped his current endeavor, all of which can be found in this program.
Social conditions such as poverty, social isolation and inability to get or prepare preferred foods can cause unintentional weight loss, and this may be particularly common in older people.[63] Nutrient intake can also be affected by culture, family and belief systems.[49] Ill-fitting dentures and other dental or oral health problems can also affect adequacy of nutrition.[49]
The Venus Factor doesn’t only help women by offering warm fuzzy feelings. It’s tailored its diet and exercise program to female physiology too. Did you know about the effects of the hormone leptin on a woman’s body during calorie restriction? Do cravings and and ravenous hunger sound familiar? They used to rule my life. The solution offered by The Venus Factor is a meal plan which alternates calorie intake each day and a weight training exercise program to restore leptin sensitivity.

In 2008, between US$33 billion and $55 billion was spent annually in the US on weight-loss products and services, including medical procedures and pharmaceuticals, with weight-loss centers taking between 6 and 12 percent of total annual expenditure. Over $1.6 billion a year was spent on weight-loss supplements. About 70 percent of Americans' dieting attempts are of a self-help nature.[36][37]
Another well-known version was recorded by the German brothers Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm in the 19th century. The tale is called "Aschenputtel" ("Cinderella" in English translations). This version is much more intense than that of Perrault and Disney, in that Cinderella's father did not die and the stepsisters mutilate their feet to fit in the golden slipper. There is no fairy godmother, but rather help comes from a wishing tree that the heroine planted on her mother's grave. In the second edition of their collection (1819), the Grimms supplemented the original 1812 version with a coda in which the stepsisters suffer a terrible punishment for their cruelty.
This individual's goal is to lose the 16 pounds she has gained. Since her weight has been gradually increasing, she knows that she is consuming more calories than she is burning, especially with her sedentary job. She decides that losing weight at a rate of 1 pound per week (equal to a deficit of about 3,500 calories, or cutting 500 calories per day) would be acceptable and would allow her to reach her goal in about four months.
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