At the ball, the entire court is entranced by Ella. She dances with Kit, much to the chagrin of the Grand Duke who has already promised Kit to Princess Chelina of Zaragoza, which Lady Tremaine overhears. Though surprised at Kit's true identity, Ella and the prince bond. Before Ella can tell Kit her name, the clock chimes midnight and she flees the palace, losing one of her slippers. Pursued by the Grand Duke and his men, Ella manages to escape home before the final stroke of midnight; the spell dissipates and everything reverts back to its true form. Ella hides the remaining slipper under her bedroom floorboards.
Categories: 2015 filmsEnglish-language films2010s historical romance films2010s romantic drama films2010s romantic fantasy filmsAmerican fantasy drama filmsAmerican filmsAmerican historical fantasy filmsAmerican historical romance filmsAmerican romantic drama filmsAmerican romantic fantasy filmsBritish fantasy drama filmsBritish filmsBritish historical fantasy filmsBritish historical romance filmsBritish romantic drama filmsBritish romantic fantasy filmsCinderella (franchise)Disney film remakesFilms about fairies and spritesFilms about royaltyFilms about weddingsFilms about wish fulfillmentFilms based on adaptationsFilms based on Charles Perrault's CinderellaFilms based on multiple worksFilms directed by Kenneth BranaghFilms produced by David BarronFilms produced by Simon KinbergFilms scored by Patrick DoyleFilms set in the 19th centuryFilms set in FranceFilms shot at Pinewood StudiosFilms shot in LondonFilms shot in Quebec2010s historical fantasy filmsIMAX filmsFilm remakesFilms with screenplays by Chris WeitzWalt Disney Pictures films
The king decides to ordain a festival that will last for three days and invites all the beautiful maidens in the land to attend so that the prince can select one of them for his bride. The two sisters are also invited, but when Aschenputtel begs them to allow her to go with them into the celebration, the stepmother refuses because she has no decent dress nor shoes to wear. When the girl insists, the woman throws a dish of lentils into the ashes for her to pick up, guaranteeing her permission to attend the festival, if she can clean up the lentils in two hours. When the girl accomplished the task in less than an hour with the help of a flock of white doves that came when she sang a certain chant, the stepmother only redoubles the task and throws down even a greater quantity of lentils. When Aschenputtel is able to accomplish it in a greater speed, not wanting to spoil her daughters' chances, the stepmother hastens away with her husband and daughters to the celebration and leaves the crying stepdaughter behind.
The number of balls varies, sometimes one, sometimes two, and sometimes three. The fairy godmother is Perrault's own addition to the tale.[26] The person who aided Cinderella (Aschenputtel) in the Grimms's version is her dead mother. Aschenputtel requests her aid by praying at her grave, on which a tree is growing. Helpful doves roosting in the tree shake down the clothing she needs for the ball. This motif is found in other variants of the tale as well, such as The Cinder Maid, collected by Joseph Jacobs, and the Finnish The Wonderful Birch. Playwright James Lapine incorporated this motif into the Cinderella plotline of the musical Into the Woods. Giambattista Basile's Cenerentola combined them; the Cinderella figure, Zezolla, asks her father to commend her to the Dove of Fairies and ask her to send her something, and she receives a tree that will provide her clothing. Other variants have her helped by talking animals, as in Katie Woodencloak, Rushen Coatie, Bawang Putih Bawang Merah, The Story of Tam and Cam, or The Sharp Grey Sheep—these animals often having some connection with her dead mother; in The Golden Slipper, a fish aids her after she puts it in water. In "The Anklet", it's a magical alabaster pot the girl purchased with her own money that brings her the gowns and the anklets she wears to the ball. Gioachino Rossini, having agreed to do an opera based on Cinderella if he could omit all magical elements, wrote La Cenerentola, in which she was aided by Alidoro, a philosopher and formerly the Prince's tutor.
Unintentional weight loss may result from loss of body fats, loss of body fluids, muscle atrophy, or a combination of these.[47][48] It is generally regarded as a medical problem when at least 10% of a person's body weight has been lost in six months[47][49] or 5% in the last month.[50] Another criterion used for assessing weight that is too low is the body mass index (BMI).[51] However, even lesser amounts of weight loss can be a cause for serious concern in a frail elderly person.[52]

Cinderella received positive reviews from critics with particular praise going to the cast, notably Blanchett, James, and Bonham Carter, Patrick Doyle's musical score, faithfulness to the original animated film, and Sandy Powell's costume designs.[84] On review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an 84% approval rating, based on 242 reviews, with a rating average of 7.16/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic."[85] Metacritic assigned the film a weighted average score of 67 out of 100, based on 47 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[86] According to CinemaScore, audiences gave the film a grade of "A" on an A+ to F scale.[87]
The best approach for weight loss is reducing the number of calories you eat while increasing the number of calories you burn through physical activity. To lose 1 pound, you need an expenditure of approximately 3,500 calories. You can achieve this either by cutting back on your food consumption, by increasing physical activity, or ideally, by doing both.
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